Project 6

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Project 6 - What Else Can Be Said About This?

B. Suvorov, Assembler, Lenino

It is well known that creating poetry was included in the obligatory program of education in the XVIIth-XVIIIth centuries, the ability to create a sonnet, a poetic congratulations, an epigraph, ultimately, was so highly appreciated in society, just like the ability to play musical instruments. But this was an indisputable quality - the ability of each person, given the chance, to shroud his thoughts in poetic form - was not the property of the "gallant" epoch along: over the course of the entire XIXth century, the ability to create verses was also widespread, verses were written, re-written, sent to one another in the mail, were read to one another when meeting, not to mention the popular literary evenings... Unfortunately, toward the end of our iron XXth century, this wonderful tradition - the existence of verses not as a crown and endeavour only of the chosen few, but rather as the "air of existence for each and every person" turned out to be lost. To resurrect it is the goal of our project as outlined below.

In beautiful corners of a park or at the intersection of busy streets, the following unusual sculpture should be erected: attach to the ground an old women's glove (of course, a plastic replica), and place around it in a semi-circle metal music stands holding texts written by invented personages who have seen this glove unexpectedly on the ground and express various associations that come into their heads as a result. These are the recollections of a woman who lost a glove just like it in her youth, of a man who recalls here a recent affair, there is a detective as well, and a lover of cleanliness... But what is very important is that each of these texts is expressed in poetic form, some of them are rhymed, some are blank verses. The social meaning of such a sculpture composition can be guessed immediately: a passerby who approaches these stands and has read them one after another, will definitely say to himself: And what could I myself say about this? And shouldn't I try to say it in verse as well?

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Instructions

1. Make five pedestals / music stands and leave them in their natural appearance, only darken them slightly. (Nail a round stick into the pedestal and attach plywood to it 44 x 35 cm)

2. Type five different texts about the lost red glove (in 4 different languages, the texts are appended) on paper that is 47 x 35 cm in a frame (cf. sketch), and glue this paper on the plywood so that the edges line up exactly.

3. Put on the floor near the wall a piece of artificial grass and place a glove on it (leather, red, a woman's glove). Attach the glove firmly to the ground so that it cannot be "picked up". 

4. Arrange the stands with the texts and the grass with the glove as indicated in the sketch: (in an incomplete semi-circle).

5. The distance between the glove and the stands is 320-350 cm.

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